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Archives: Kimbilio

The Kimbilio Interview

The Kimbilio Interview

Here’s a nice interview I did with Hope Wabuke for the Kimbilio website.  While you’re there, also check out the bios of our 2014 Fellows.  I can’t wait to meet them in person.

KCAAF: Where did you grow up?

David Haynes: I grew up outside of St. Louis, in a small community of working class black folks surrounded on all sides by working class white folks.

KCAAF: What was that like? How did it influence you?

David Haynes: Our little “pocket” community was stable and wonderfully nurturing. Same families in the same houses for half a century or more. It’s also true that that kind of insularity can also be stifling at times. This community will be the subject of the novella and stories I’m working on now.

KCAAF: Please tell us some of the books/writers you love.

David Haynes: I read widely and learn from everything I read. This past year, like much of the rest of the literary world, I’ve been celebrating Alice Munro. I’m a writer who thinks structurally, and Munro’s work continues to teach me to think rigorously about the importance of narrative design in storytelling.

Read the rest of the interview here:  http://kimbiliofiction.com/2014/06/10/20-questions-with-david-haynes/

Kimbilio 2014

Kimbilio 2014

So this is the week of updates on my other projects. I’m so excited to be hosting in July the second summer retreat for Kimbilio. Find more about the project and about the application process on this webpage.

http://kimbiliofiction.com/

And here, from the Book Country blog, is an enchanting blogpost about the Kimbilio experience by the equally enchanting young woman, pictured above:

The Importance of Meaningful Writing Communities by Khaliah Williams

Sometime in the autumn of 2006, I decided that I wanted to be a writer. I took several writing workshops at The New School in New York City, where I worked. I often found myself scribbling down ideas that would be the foundation of my novel (still in progress) in notebooks during my hour long commute between the village and The Bronx. Getting in the way of my writing ambitions was the problem of my full time job. My writing life, I wrote in my graduate school applications, exists in stolen moments at the office and crowded subway cars. I wanted more.

Click on this sentence to read the rest of the post.  

I Can’t Say it Enough

thankyou

Sanctuary, Haven, Asylum, Refuge.  Kimbilio can be translated variously: Even with the world’s most careful planning (and my service ARE for rent, at prices you most certainly cannot afford) the past week’s shelter and solace only happened because of the people who came together to make them happen.  There’ll be plenty of time to debrief, but first the public appreciation to those without whom none of this would have been a success. 

Working My Way Through This List

Screen Shot 2013-07-27 at 6.35.54 PM

Just attended the best literary event of my life, and, guess what?  It was my f@&%!^& event!  An evaluation from the world’s toughest critic reports that the inaugural Kimbilio retreat was a massive success.  Which is to say that no one is harder on himself than me, and I couldn’t be more pleased with the outcome.

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